Difference between Food Allergy, Sensitivity and Intolerance

food intolerance

If you find that you get sick after eating a particular food, you may wonder if you have a food allergy, sensitivity or intolerance. Understanding the problem can help you to see its causes. Food intolerance is far more common than food allergy.

Although allergies, intolerances and sensitivities can present with similar symptoms, there are a few key differences to sort them from each other.

What is a Food Allergy ?

Food allergies are diagnosed when a person’s immune system responds after they eat a certain food. This response involves IgE antibodies that stimulate the release of chemicals including histamines that then cause physical symptoms. In addition to the symptoms of allergic response like dyspnea and skin hives, food allergies can also cause gastrointestinal symptoms like abdominal cramping, diarrhea and vomiting.

What is food intolerance?

A food intolerance differs from an allergy in that there is no immune system response to the offending food. Food intolerance occurs at the level of the gastrointestinal system, it is the gastrointestinal system’s inability to digest the food. Examples are intolerance to fructose, lactose etc.

What is food sensitivity?

 Sometimes a particular food may bother a person without any medical reason. Common symptoms of food sensitivity are fatigue, headache, digestive issues and skin rashes. A  list of common food sensitivities are:

  • Dairy products
  • Eggs
  • Gluten
  • Corn
  • Soy
  • Coffee

What should you do if you suspect any of these problems?

If you are concerned that you have a food allergy or intolerance, discuss this with your doctor. Food allergy and sensitivity testing can be done with a blood or skin test. Do not begin arbitrarily by restricting your diet which can lead to nutritional deficiencies.

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Kilimanjaro Expedition – Part 6

Kilimanjaro part 6

Part six and Day five of a bloody long walk

At the summit – now that all the yahooing, crying, tears, handshakes and hugs are all over we can hear the head guide telling us not to go to sleep and to start to make our way back down.  I’m physically and emotionally shattered by this point.  All I really want to do is have a feed and lay down for a sleep.  Closing my eyes seems soothing and a blessing.

Standing up is hard, however, I just have to do it or never leave.  And that wouldn’t be a good look.  Plus the paperwork, LOL! So we’re off down the same path we walked up.  One foot after another and those boots didn’t lose weight, they seemed to gain it.  The sun is up and I’m keen for breakfast.  Knowing there are no cafes up here you have to move!

Back to lifting my feet and instantly judging the ground.  You definitely don’t want a broken or sprained ankle at this altitude!  Time was slow enough going up the night earlier, now that the sun is up my eyes are stinging and want to close.  My guide grabs me and says we have to go.  Over rocks, around rocks, along narrow tracks where you need to bend over to slide between boulders.  And, finally, we get to the top of the scree.  My guide tells me it’s like skiing.  Cool.  I’ve never been skiing before!  This’ll be fun.  I worked out to take big steps.  At times you slide into the scree up to your knees, then you throw the back leg forward and do it all over again.  Oh, and don’t forget to listen out for someone yelling out “rock”.  Time to stop, look and stand aside as it rolls past you.  An interesting sight for a person who can see, and an interesting sound for me.  The air is extremely dry and your mouth dries out really quickly!  I’m thankful for my gaters as they help to keep the scree out of our boots.

On arrival, the hut at Camp Kibo is a lovely sight, even though I can’t see it.  Unfortunately, we’re asked to get our gear packed, go to the toilet if you have to, have a drink of water,  and prepare to move on.  There are lots of tired and excited voices around all looking forward to a feed and sleep but that’s not till we get to the Horombo Hutts, 3700m above sea level.

As the group leaves Camp Kibo the first snow of winter begins.  Such a lovely sight for the sighted persons to see, especially for those who haven’t been in snow before.  I can hear the snow hitting my rain jacket.  A very settling sound.  No trees, no shrubs, no grass.  Just rocks, dirt, snow and a number of tired, excited trekkers.

That afternoon we make it back to the Horombo Huts and are allocated cabins for the night.  With my guide I find mine and get inside to unpack and pack the days clothing.  Sit on my bed, actually more like fall onto my bed, which is on the floor. Another trekker askes if he can sit beside me.  “Mate, I don’t care where you sit, just not on me, I’m shattered!”  He says that he’s no better.  That was a bloody long day!!!

There’s dinner and a regroup that night.  The next morning the alarm is set for 6:30am.  Bottles are left outside for the porters to fill for us.  Down to the food hall for breakfast where there is no milo and the porridge is very watery.  Just add salt to flavour! Then we’re off again.  The track hasn’t changed except for the grasses, shrubs and foliage.  We’re beginning to hear birds again and a bird similar to a crow.  Around lunchtime, we stop at an area with timber picnic tables and benches.  We are presented with, I think, pieces of chicken and what felt like french toast.  Kind of rubbery, but tasty.  You’re really looking forward to a cafe to order something you can recognise!

We made it back to the 2700m above sea level Mandara huts.  Another welcome sight.  We’re given the opportunity to relax for the afternoon and explore to the near lookout at Maundi crater over looking Kenya   and Northern Tanzania.  You can see a very long way.

The next day, we’re off to the gate this time back the way we came.  Taller trees are gathering around us, more birds and monkeys in the trees.  Before leaving the Mandara Huts we are advised that near the gate leading out we may have children on the track about 5 or 6 years old selling chocolates.  We have been given stricked instructions not to look them in the eye.  To look straight forward and ignore them.  With money in my pocket that was difficult and I did shed a tear.  “Chocolate for a dollar”, “Chocolate for a dollar” is what they are saying.  That’s their living.

Well, we’ve made it out and wait for the trek leader to sign us out of the National Park.  We’re loaded into the bus to take us back to the resort with the eight-foot fence and barbed wire to have a shower, change and then we can go into Moshi to buy a souvenir.  Now that’s an experience!  I’ll tell you about it next blog.

See ya’

​Strengthen Your Core With Planks

Contrary to popular belief, your “core muscles” are not just the abdominals above your belly. They are a complex group of muscles running as a band from the top of your ribs to the top of your hips, all the way round.

Your core technically includes your pelvic floor muscles, your internal and external oblique, rectus abdominis, the erector spinae and multifidus, and all the deeper, smaller muscles in your trunk. This group of muscles or core protects the body, stabilizes your spine and pelvis and is your powerhouse for movement. 

One way to test whether your core is weak is to hold a hollowing of your lower belly for ten seconds. Alternately, holding a plank position for fifty seconds. If you fail these tests, potentially, your core is weak.

How can you strengthen your core muscles?

Planks are a great (and some say the best) way to strengthen your core muscles. In addition – plank exercises strengthen many other parts of your body including your hip flexors, low back, pelvis, glutes, and, the shoulder girdle.

To improve poor posture, practicing planks and sitting with your core engaged and your shoulders pulled back can be effective. A little and often is best.

Having an arched lower back may also be a sign that your core muscles are weak. Over time, this pelvic tilt position can contribute to back, knee and hip pain or, may result in injury when lifting heavy items. Making planks a part of your morning routine can help!

Some people feel weak while jumping, throwing or doing a bicep curl. Again – this can indicate an untrained core. Exercises including planks can be improve this weakness as our core muscles stabilize our trunk. Once this is achieved – adding movement is considerably easier and power and strength is available to the other muscles providing this movement. 

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This is a secure Australian site allowing you, the customer, to purchase the products and have them delivered direct to your door.

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Why A Gluten Free Diet Might Not Be Healthy For You

Gluten is a complex protein structure that is found in food. It acts like a glue, giving shape to your food. Interestingly, the name glu – ten is derived from this glue-like property of wet dough. It’s typically found in wheat and similar food products like barley and rye.  

While most people are able to tolerate gluten and experience no negative reaction from their body to gluten, people with coeliac disease, gluten sensitivity, wheat allergy or some other diseases are intolerant and have severe reactions to gluten.  

Gluten free diets have become very popular. Many celebrities and athletes have claimed that everyone can benefit from a gluten-free diet. But is this true? This article explores whether it is actually a good decision to cut all gluten from your diet.   

By eliminating gluten from their diets, people with coeliac disease and sensitivity to wheat experience lessening or resolution of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, fatigue and diarrhea or constipation over time. 

With these testimonies in mind – many people have jumped on the gluten-free bandwagon without taking into account any risks involved in doing so. Some people mistake themselves as being sensitive to gluten when they’re sensitive to other components of wheat such as fructans. Gluten is often the scapegoat when in fact, there might be other causes for symptoms of intolerance. These may be alleviated but not fully by going “gluten-free”.  

In addition – there may be nutritional downsides to going gluten-free. You might not get enough Vitamin B, Fibre and Iron. Gluten free foods may have just as many calories and, replacing gluten might add a lot of fat and sugars to the foods consumed. Ultimately, you may end up taking in more calories when you eliminate gluten. 

Going gluten free is not necessarily a good choice. In general, and without evidence for a specific intolerance – increasing fiber intake and reducing calories is the best way to lose weight and maintain a healthy diet.

About Groceries For Health

Groceries for Health are a proud Inner Origin Advocate.  Inner Origin products have been selected with care and follow strict guidelines to adhere to our philosophy.

This is a secure Australian site allowing you, the customer, to purchase the products and have them delivered direct to your door.

You shop, we pack and deliver.

organic australian groceries and products